SUPERVISORS

 

 

DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS
& ASTRONOMY

ROB KIEFL

 
Professor Department of Physics and Astronomy (UBC) kiefl@triumf.ca Research field: Quantum materials and their interfaces Rob is an expert in Muon spin rotations and beta-NMR. He was awarded UBC's Killam Prize and McDowell Medal and the Herzberg Medal from the Canadian Association of Physicists. He is a fellow of the APS and is the author of over 250 peer-reviewed publications.

Professor
Department of Physics and Astronomy (UBC)

kiefl@triumf.ca

Research field: Quantum materials and their interfaces

Rob is an expert in Muon spin rotations and beta-NMR. He was awarded UBC's Killam Prize and McDowell Medal and the Herzberg Medal from the Canadian Association of Physicists. He is a fellow of the APS and is the author of over 250 peer-reviewed publications.

JENS DILLING

 
Adjunct Professor Department of Physics and Astronomy (UBC) Associate Laboratory Director Physics Sciences (interim) Department Head Nuclear Physics (TRIUMF) jdilling@triumf.ca Research field: Nuclear structure, nuclear astrophysics and precision mass measurements Jens is Director of International Affairs of CAP and the Chair of the Canadian IUPAP committee. He was the 2012 CAP Vogt Medal recipient for outstanding contributions to subatomic physics. He is a fellow at the APS and received the 2015 GSI GENCO award for exotic isotopes. Jens has given over 150 talks and seminars and has over 100 peer-reviewed papers and over 3500 citations. 

Adjunct Professor
Department of Physics and Astronomy (UBC)
Associate Laboratory Director Physics Sciences (interim)

Department Head Nuclear Physics (TRIUMF)

jdilling@triumf.ca

Research field: Nuclear structure, nuclear astrophysics and precision mass measurements

Jens is Director of International Affairs of CAP and the Chair of the Canadian IUPAP committee. He was the 2012 CAP Vogt Medal recipient for outstanding contributions to subatomic physics. He is a fellow at the APS and received the 2015 GSI GENCO award for exotic isotopes. Jens has given over 150 talks and seminars and has over 100 peer-reviewed papers and over 3500 citations. 

REINER KRUECKEN

 
Professor Department of Physics and Astronomy (UBC) Deputy Director (TRIUMF) reiner.kruecken@triumf.ca Research field: Physics of exotic nuclei, nuclear astrophysics, neutrinos double beta decay Reiner is a world-leading expert on the physics of rare isotopes. He is a member of international advisory and review committees in Canada, Germany, Finland, France, Austria, and the USA and has over 360 publications and over 6000 citations. 

Professor
Department of Physics and Astronomy (UBC)
Deputy Director (TRIUMF)

reiner.kruecken@triumf.ca

Research field: Physics of exotic nuclei, nuclear astrophysics, neutrinos double beta decay

Reiner is a world-leading expert on the physics of rare isotopes. He is a member of international advisory and review committees in Canada, Germany, Finland, France, Austria, and the USA and has over 360 publications and over 6000 citations. 

VESNA SOSSI

 
Professor Department of Physics and Astronomy (UBC) vesna@phas.ubc.ca Research field: PET imaging, instrumentation, algorithms, analysis and application to preclinical disease models and clinical Parkinson's disease Vesna is an international leader in PET imaging. She is the director of the UBC PET and microSPECT Imaging Laboratory and sits on several review committees. She has over 160 peer-reviewed papers.

Professor
Department of Physics and Astronomy (UBC)

vesna@phas.ubc.ca

Research field: PET imaging, instrumentation, algorithms, analysis and application to preclinical disease models and clinical Parkinson's disease

Vesna is an international leader in PET imaging. She is the director of the UBC PET and microSPECT Imaging Laboratory and sits on several review committees. She has over 160 peer-reviewed papers.

DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY

ANDREW MACFARLANE

 
Associate Professor Chemistry Department (UBC) wam@chem.ubc.ca Research field: Electronic and magnetic properties of crystalline solids Andrew has trained more than 20 highly qualified personnel at the undergraduate, graduate, and postdoctoral levels. He has over 120 peer-reviewed publications.

Associate Professor
Chemistry Department (UBC)

wam@chem.ubc.ca

Research field: Electronic and magnetic properties of crystalline solids

Andrew has trained more than 20 highly qualified personnel at the undergraduate, graduate, and postdoctoral levels. He has over 120 peer-reviewed publications.

DEPARTMENT OF RADIOLOGY

PAUL SCHAFFER

 
Assistant Professor Department of Radiology (UBC) Associate Laboratory Director - Life Sciences (TRIUMF) pschaffer@triumf.ca Research field: Accelerator targets, isotope production, radiochemistry Paul is a world-leading expert in developing radiotracers for nuclear imaging. He spent several years at GE Global Research and led the $6 million multi-institutional team effort that demonstrated feasibility for commercial-scale production of Tc-99m.

Assistant Professor
Department of Radiology (UBC)
Associate Laboratory Director - Life Sciences (TRIUMF)

pschaffer@triumf.ca

Research field: Accelerator targets, isotope production, radiochemistry

Paul is a world-leading expert in developing radiotracers for nuclear imaging. He spent several years at GE Global Research and led the $6 million multi-institutional team effort that demonstrated feasibility for commercial-scale production of Tc-99m.

DEPARTMENT OF EARTH, OCEAN
& ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCES

MAITE MALDONADO

 
Associate Professor Department of Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Sciences (UBC) mmaldona@eos.ubc.ca Research field: Phytoplankton trace metal physiology Maite is the Canada Research Chair II. She has over 2000 citations and 40 publications in high impact journals, including four manuscripts in Nature.

Associate Professor
Department of Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Sciences (UBC)

mmaldona@eos.ubc.ca

Research field: Phytoplankton trace metal physiology

Maite is the Canada Research Chair II. She has over 2000 citations and 40 publications in high impact journals, including four manuscripts in Nature.

FACULTY OF PHARMACEUTICAL SCIENCES

URS HAFELI

 
Associate Professor Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences (UBC) urs.hafeli@ubc.ca Research field: Development of diagnostic and therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals Urs holds four US patents and has two pending. He has over 97 peer-reviewed journal publications. 

Associate Professor
Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences (UBC)

urs.hafeli@ubc.ca

Research field: Development of diagnostic and therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals

Urs holds four US patents and has two pending. He has over 97 peer-reviewed journal publications. 

The detection of very rare decay events, such as the neutrino-less double beta decay requires the development of very sensitive and low-background detectors. The project will involve the development of Silicon Photomultiplier (SiPM) detectors for the nEXO project. SiPM detectors are light sensors that are also of interest in medical imaging and other radiation detection systems.

The use of different isotopes for β-NMR will be developed that will broaden the spectrum of β-NMR applications. For example, the short-lived isotope Mg-31 will enable diagnosis of the local chemical binding environment of atoms, studying the role of magnesium in the catalytic activity of enzymes, in chlorophyll in photosynthesis, and membrane protein ion transport. Be-11 is also of interest.

The magnetic response of the near surface region of SRF cavity materials will be studies with β-NMR to develop higher performance cavities needed for next generation accelerators.

Interfaces can have a profound influence on ionic conductivity in solid-state ionic devices, such as rechargeable batteries, that rely on Li conduction through interfaces. In collaboration with the MPI-FKF Stuttgart, the power of depth-resolved beta-detected NMR will be applied to test and refine understanding of the microscopic variation of ionic mobility due to interface effects, starting with LiF/TiO2.

Our understanding of where the heavy elements from Iron to Uranium have been produced in the universe depends on the knowledge of nuclear properties and reaction rates of short-lived very neutron-rich isotopes involved in the astrophysical rapid neutron-capture process (r-process). This includes measurements of masses, decay spectroscopy using gamma, beta, and neutron detection, as well as reaction studies using charged particle and gamma-ray detection. These experimental investigations are guided by studies of the impact of more precise knowledge of nuclear properties on astrophysical simulations of element production in cataclysmic astrophysical events such as supernova explosions or neutron-star mergers are required.

The study of nuclear reactions in stars and stellar explosions requires intense beams of specific rare isotopes like O-15, Ti-44, P-30. New target-ion-source technologies will be developed to produce such beams.

Isotopes for material and nuclear science are extracted after effusing from the hot production target. Studies of effusion times and efficiencies will be carried out as function of temperature and chemical conditions to optimize yields.

In order to optimize target designs for isotopes in all areas of science and medicine, it is essential to understand the production rates as well as the subsequent release processes in the targets. FLUKA simulations of liquid and solid targets for nuclear medicine and nuclear science will be carried out.

The isotope astatine-211 (At-211) offers the possibility of selectively delivering a lethal dose of radiation to the tumour cells by means of targeted radionuclide therapy through labeled anti-bodies. Within TRIUMF’s new ARIEL facility the production, and extraction of the beta-decaying At-211 precursor radon-211will be developed and radiopharmaceutical production of choice therapeutics will be carried out.

The design and synthesis of novel molecular imaging agents will be pursued, using established and new radioisotopes, including small molecules, large molecular weight radiotracers, such as peptides, proteins, oligonucleotides, and peptide nucleic acids with radiometals, as well as radiolabelled monosized nanoparticles, microspheres, and polymers that can be made into films, filaments, particles of predefined shapes.

Amino acids are critical nutrients that can regulate cellular physiology by modulating gene expression and signal transduction pathways. Studies of the cysteine transporter will be carried out with radiolabelled amino acids to examine non-metabolic tumour cell compensatory mechanisms related to oxidative stress.

The new preclinical PET/SPECT/CT Imaging Program at the UBC Centre for Comparative Medicine (CCM) provides exciting new opportunities to develop and test new compounds that might use either positron or single gamma emitters as radiolabels, based on isotope production and radiochemistry-based research at TRIUMF.

A new target design will be developed for higher current (>20 μA) irradiation to achieve larger isotope production yields in order to expand the utility of hospital based cyclotrons for the production of new isotopes. The design and testing of liquid target technology will also create better understanding of processes involved in isotope production and extraction.

The prospects to expand the studies of trace metal physiology to other short-lived radioisotopes, such as molybdenum and chromium, will be investigated on the production side as well as their efficacy in laboratory and field studies.

Studies will be carried out investigating how climate-mediated changes in Fe and Cu availability in the ocean will influence CO2 fixation via photosynthesis, heterotrophic bacterial respiration of organic carbon, as well as CH4 oxidation and N2O cycling.